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  • ‘The Fight’: Film Review January 24, 2020
    In 1988, presidential candidate George H.W. Bush dismissed his rival Michael Dukakis as a “card-carrying member of the ACLU.” By contrast, Bush proclaimed himself “for the people,” as though the American Civil Liberties Union, a nonprofit organization that defends the equal human rights established in the Constitution, was instead championing UFOs. There’s a […]
    Amy Nicholson
  • Sean Hannity’s Newest Assignment Takes Him to Super Bowl LIV January 24, 2020
    Sean Hannity has talked with President Donald Trump many times, but never quite like this. Hannity is the latest TV-news personality to take on what has in recent years developed into a Super Bowl Sunday tradition: a pre-game interview with the President of the United States. Savannah Guthrie, Gayle King and Bill O’Reilly are among […]
    Brian Steinberg
  • CBS Orders Comedy Pilot From ‘9JKL’ Creator, Comedian James Acaster January 24, 2020
    CBS is developing a project that takes a comedic look at the age-old “12 Angry Men” dilemma of how does a jury come to a unanimous verdict? The network has issued a pilot order for “We The Jury,” a hybrid series from “9JKL” co-creator Dana Klein and Stephanie Darrow. The project hails from CBS Television […]
    Will Thorne
  • Will Forte Lands Oceanfront Contemporary Near Monterey January 24, 2020
    Actor and comedian Will Forte has splashed out $6.25 million for a dynamically sited contemporary in the rugged but ritzy and seriously expensive Carmel Highlands area, about ten miles south of the coastal community of Monterey, California. As was noted by the celebrity property gossips at Realtor.com, who first sussed out the clandestine late 2019 […] […]
    PMC
  • Taylor Swift Bows Out of Unannounced Grammy Performance January 24, 2020
    Taylor Swift has bowed out of a possible performance on the Grammy Awards program Sunday night just as stealthily as it appeared she might have bowed into it, multiple sources tell Variety. Her possible appearance on the show had been kept a secret — albeit not an extremely well-kept secret —  so her exit won’t […]
    chrislwillman
  • ‘American Idol’ Producer Fremantle Looks To Reduce Global Environmental Footprint January 24, 2020
    Aiming to reduce its waste and emissions, London-based “Idol” producer-distributor Fremantle has formed a partnership with Albert, a collaborative industry-backed project aimed at tackling the environmental impact of the entertainment sector.  Founded in 2011, Albert is governed by an industry consortium that includes BAFTA, independent companies and broadca […]
    msravindran
  • Private Investigator Testifies Harvey Weinstein Asked Him to Look Into ‘Red Flag List’ of Women January 24, 2020
    A private investigator was called to testify on Friday afternoon during the Harvey Weinstein trial. Sam Anson, an investigator for the company Guidepost Solutions, was called in as a witness by the state. Anson said he was approached directly by Weinstein to investigate people he believed were talking to journalists about his sexual conduct with […]
    Elizabeth Wagmeister
  • Warner Bros. Launches $1.1 million Funding Initiative in Germany January 24, 2020
    Warner Bros.’ Hamburg-based German division, Warner Bros. Entertainment GmbH, has agreed for the first time to financial contributions of €1 million ($1.1 million) annually for regional funder Filmförderung Hamburg Schleswig-Holstein (FFHSH). The three-year deal, signed between Warner Bros. and the FFHSH on Friday, marks the first time that Warner Bros. has […]
    msravindran
  • Intl. TV Newswire: NATPE Deals, ZED Pre-sales, Aardman Distribution January 24, 2020
    In this week’s International TV Newswire Variety recaps more NATPE news from All3Media, Comedy Central Latin America, AMC’s Acorn TV, VIS, El Deseo, Globo and Univision, ZED pre-sales from Realscreen and Aardman’s latest distribution pickup. All3Media Sells to Comedy Central, AMC Networks in Latin America Comedy Central Latin America and All3Media Internatio […]
    John Hopewell
  • ‘Falling’: Film Review January 24, 2020
    Viggo Mortensen may have three Oscar nominations to his name, but I get the feeling most folks still don’t take the guy seriously enough. Maybe they don’t realize that, in addition to his acting work, Mortensen is also a painter, a poet, a photographer and a musician. When “The Lord of the Rings” made him […]
    Peter Debruge

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  • ICYMI: Falling iguanas, deadly spiders and swarms of locusts, oh my! January 25, 2020
    Falling iguanas, killer spiders and unprecedented locust swarms — all fueled by weather extremes. Not to mention an epic blizzard in Canada, a deadly, days-long storm in Europe and a rare January tornado in the Pacific Northwest. You’d be forgiven for thinking these are signs of the apocalypse. As far as we can tell, it...
  • Spain scrambles to recover after Gloria leaves path of destruction January 25, 2020
    Residents and officials throughout Spain have struggled to grapple with the destruction Storm Gloria has left in its wake. The battered country, now scrambling to clean up the mess, faces damaged railways and collapsed bridges amid the wreckage. Spain’s Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez spent the week analyzing the stricken regions of the country, including a... […]
  • Groundhog Day storm brewing? Forecasters monitoring the situation closely January 24, 2020
    The weather pattern seems to be stuck in “weekend storm mode,” and one such potential weather system could take shape and impact the eastern United States in early February, making it the third weekend in a row that the region faces a storm threat. A storm affected the central and northeastern United States with a...
  • Sluggish storm to keep dumping snow over Midwest January 24, 2020
    A slow-moving storm already responsible for dumping more than half a foot of snow on parts of Missouri and Iowa will continue to produce fresh powder over a portion of the Midwest as it sluggishly drifts eastward into the weekend. As snow returns to Chicago and Milwaukee and reaches Detroit, air and ground travel disruptions...
  • Drawn out of darkness: This US town just saw 1st sunrise since November January 24, 2020
    For the first time since Nov. 18, the northernmost city in the United States saw the sun rise above the horizon on Thursday afternoon. Utqiaġvik, formerly known as Barrow, is located on the northern tip of Alaska far above the Arctic Circle. After 65 days of darkness, the sun rose at 1:09 p.m. AKST on...
  • Weather impacting NFL Pro Bowlers all week in Orlando January 23, 2020
    Following a late-week storm with drenching rain and thunder, a new storm is forecast to take shape over Texas and advance eastward over the Gulf of Mexico region this weekend. A powerhouse storm is not expected to develop, but the system has the potential to disrupt some weekend outdoor plans from the Texas coast to the...
  • Australians told to be on alert for deadly spider after heat, recent rain January 23, 2020
    After dealing with catastrophic fires then flooding and hailstorms, Australians are being warned to watch out for one of the world’s most deadly spiders due to what experts call “perfect conditions” for the arachnid to thrive. In a video posted to the Australian Reptile Park Facebook page, spokesman Dan Rumsey said the escalated threat from...
  • Northeast to face wide range of impacts from next potent winter storm January 23, 2020
    A storm trekking across the country toward the Northeast will arrive this weekend, but the latest forecast indicates a shift in the amount of snow it will produce — and where the snow will fall. Even though the storm slated for the Northeast continues to trend warmer, snow is still forecast to bury the northern...
  • Tragedy in NJ as 2 teens die after falling through thin ice January 23, 2020
    A pair of tragedies unfolded in New Jersey on Wednesday night when five teenagers fell through thin ice covering ponds in two towns across the state. The separate accidents left two teens dead and numerous others injured, including the emergency responders who worked to save them. In Carteret, located about 25 miles southwest of New...
  • 'Unprecedented' locust swarms devastating several countries in Africa fueled by multiple weather factors January 23, 2020
    Photos show intense swarms of desert locusts surrounding villagers in Kenya, where the insects are destroying crops.

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  • US ready for potential coronavirus outbreak, CDC assures lawmakers
    Federal health officials told lawmakers Friday that they have the resources they need to address the spread of the virus originating from Wuhan, China, although senators acknowledged the potential need for supplemental funding down the road. The briefing for roughly two dozen senators came as the case count for the new version of coronavirus in China was rapidly increasing, prompting authorities there to effectively quarantine tens of millions of people in Wuhan and surrounding cities. China’s National Health Commission reported 571 cases and 17 deaths as of Thursday, though news reports on Friday said there were now more than 800 cases and at least 26 deaths.
  • Executive privilege standoff could roil Trump impeachment trial timeline
    A legal fight over executive privilege in the middle of the Senate’s impeachment trial of President Donald Trump could put it into suspended animation. If senators ultimately decide to subpoena Trump administration documents or seek witness testimony, House Democratic managers might have to decide whether to now wage court battles that were avoided during the House phase of the impeachment process.
  • What's in an impeachment trial?
    CQ Roll Call takes listeners inside Congress to where the impeachment trial is happening and shares its insightful observations from reporters. Also, we compare and contrast the impeachment of President Clinton to President Trump. How have times changed?  
  • ‘We gotta go, the trial started at 1 o’clock!’ — Congressional Hits and Misses
    Naps, milk and fidget spinners all supposedly made appearances during the Senate trial this week. But most of us wouldn’t know, since C-SPAN’s cameras were restricted. But the Senate chamber cameras at least picked up Biggie Smalls lyrics, Supreme Court lecturing and desperate pleas to let Senators take a break for dinner.  
  • This is what a giant pile of impeachment candy looks like
    If you’re wondering how the Senate impeachment trial is going, consider this historic photo. A pallet of candy stands outside Sen. Pat Toomey’s office, shrink-wrapped. Notice the Hershey’s bars (milk chocolate with almonds). And the Rolos. And the stray Mike and Ikes (flavor: berry blast).
  • Democrats pick women from key 2020 states for State of the Union response
    Democratic leaders announced Friday that Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and Texas Rep. Veronica Escobar, who both hail from critical 2020 states, will give the responses to President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address on Feb. 4. Whitmer leads Michigan, a top presidential and congressional battleground that Trump won by less than half a percentage point in 2016. Escobar, who will give the Spanish-language response to the president’s address, represents a deep-blue district in Texas, where Democrats are hoping to make gains in the state’s diversifying suburbs. 
  • Photos of the week: Trump's impeachment trial begins
    There wasn’t supposed to be a photos of the week this week because of the scheduled Congressional Martin Luther King Day recess. But since these are not normal times, we bring you our favorite impeachment trial photos of the week plus a bonus photo of Mayor Pete. Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call on your iPhone.
  • Democrats seek to put teeth into ‘impoundment’ law
    A fresh legal opinion challenging President Donald Trump’s hold on Ukraine military aid under a Nixon-era budget law may or may not move the needle with senators in the president’s impeachment trial. But one thing is clear: Trump’s delay of $214 million in Pentagon funds is just the latest in a long line of findings by the Government Accountability Office going back decades that presidents of both parties have run afoul of the 1974 law. That statute was aimed at restricting “impoundments,” where the executive branch refuses to spend money appropriated by Congress.
  • Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 24
    File updated 1:55 p.m. House impeachment managers on Friday launched their third and final day of arguments to remove President Donald Trump from office by focusing on a delayed military aid package to Ukraine, which House members say Trump withheld in hopes of receiving political favors from Kyiv.
  • Impeachment managers attempt to preempt Trump’s defense
    Regardless of whether Democratic impeachment managers get to call witnesses in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump, they are already making their case by using the president’s own words — and even those of a prominent Republican senator — in dramatic fashion in the Senate chamber.  The managers focused much of their arguments Thursday on the abuse of power charge the House used to condemn Trump, citing history and attempting to poke preemptive holes in the defense team’s upcoming arguments.
  • View from the gallery: Senators sit, spin and fidget during Trump trial
    Sen. Bill Cassidy charted a course along the back corner of the Senate chamber Thursday during President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial. The Louisiana Republican walked through an area usually reserved for staff seating, hands in pockets, retracing a short path over and over again for more than 15 minutes. When Georgia Republican David Perdue took to standing along his path, Cassidy squeezed by and just kept pacing.
  • Mayors see historic opportunity in presidential race
    A promise to repair potholes won’t get a laugh at most presidential campaign events.  But Mike Bloomberg knew his audience.
  • Trump administration restricts U.S. travel for pregnant foreigners
    The State Department issued a new rule Thursday that will make it more difficult for pregnant women abroad to obtain visas to the United States, an attempt to curb what the White House is calling "birth tourism." The department will grant visa officers more discretion to deny nonimmigrant visas to women they believe are entering the United States specifically to obtain citizenship for their child by giving birth here, a State Department spokesperson told reporters during a background briefing.
  • Do Republicans hate or respect Adam Schiff? Maybe it’s both
    To President Donald Trump and his House Republican allies, Rep. Adam B. Schiff is public enemy No. 1. But as the lead House impeachment manager makes his case against Trump in the Senate, the California Democrat has drawn some surprising compliments from a few GOP senators. That’s not to say that Trump will stop attacking the man he calls “Shifty Schiff,” or that other Republicans won’t use Schiff as the scapegoat for everything they think is wrong with the House Democrats’ impeachment charges.
  • Green card gridlock: When will Congress agree on a solution?
    On Dec. 18, immigration reform stalwart Richard J. Durbin’s announcement on the Senate floor about a rare bipartisan breakthrough flew largely under the radar, overshadowed in the chaotic flurry of impeachment. Durbin, an Illinois Democrat, and Republican Sen. Mike Lee of Utah had dueled two months earlier over unanimous consent requests on the Senate floor, and had since been deadlocked. Each had pushed for his own solution to an important but often overlooked symptom of the broken U.S. immigration system: the employment-based green card backlog. Because of it, hundreds of thousands of people — overwhelmingly from India — wait in limbo, sometimes for decades.
  • Fear of ICE raids during census could hamper count of immigrants
    As census efforts ramp up this spring, outreach organizations fear that Trump administration officials may try to deport the immigrant communities they need to count. A network of nonprofits, local governments and advocacy groups has fanned out to help the Census Bureau conduct its decennial count of America’s residents. Some advocates worry the administration, after its failed push to add a citizenship question to the census, may continue on-the-ground immigration enforcement efforts in a departure from previous censuses.
  • What day of the Trump trial is it? It turns out there’s no wrong answer
    When did the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump begin? This publication says Wednesday, but depending on which news outlet you watch or read, Thursday could be the second, third or fourth day of the trial.
  • At the Races: Trial vs. Trail
    By Simone Pathé, Stephanie Akin and Bridget Bowman  Welcome to At the Races! Each week we’ll bring you news and analysis from the CQ Roll Call team that will keep you informed about the 2020 election. Know someone who’d like to get this newsletter? They can subscribe here.
  • Impeachment trial takes vulnerable senators off the campaign trail, too
    Sen. Doug Jones’ campaign is holding an event Friday, but the Alabama Democrat won’t be there. Instead, Valerie Jarrett, an adviser to former President Barack Obama, is hosting the forum on women in leadership in Birmingham. Jones, the most vulnerable senator in 2020, will be in the Senate chamber for the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump, alternating between blue and red felt-tipped pens as he takes notes on opening arguments. Sitting with him will be other colleagues who face competitive races, either in November or sooner in party primaries.
  • Burr is giving senators fidget spinners to stay busy during trial
    Sen. Richard M. Burr is trying to help out his antsy Senate colleagues. The North Carolina Republican is providing an assortment of fidget spinners and other gizmos to his GOP colleagues at this week’s Thursday lunch.
  • EPA finalizes clean water rollback amid science challenges
    The Trump administration on Thursday finalized a rule that significantly reduces the federal government’s role in regulating waterways, fulfilling a campaign promise to farmers and energy interests and handing a win to conservatives who have pushed for changes to the Clean Water Act regulations. The rule, which redefines what constitutes “waters of the United States,” revises decades-old standards for regulating waterways, a move environmentalists warn will lead to pollution of water that wildlife and people depend on, especially in low-income areas and communities of color. Several current and former EPA and Army Corps of Engineers employees and scientific advisers oppose the move, charging that political appointees blocked the use of scientific information in writing the rule.
  • Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 23
    File updated 7:45 p.m. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, one of the Democrats running for president, said in response to a question about the possibility of a court battle about executive privilege claims by the Trump White House that the Senate should do what’s needed, even if it prolongs the chamber's impeachment trial.
  • View from the gallery: Senators seek comfort and novelty during Trump trial
    Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton was among the first senators spotted ordering milk to the Senate chamber for President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial Wednesday, and he took small sips to wash down what looked like a Hershey’s chocolate bar. This was the second day of the third presidential impeachment trial in U.S. history, and the 100 senators began to search in earnest for comfort and novelty during eight hours of opening statements from House managers.
  • House managers stick to script on first day of Trump trial arguments
    House impeachment managers on Wednesday dutifully stayed on message throughout the second full day of the Senate impeachment trial, arguing that the findings of the House’s impeachment inquiry provide ample evidence to warrant the removal of President Donald Trump from office. The team of seven managers took turns presenting their case, starting with House Intelligence Chairman Adam B. Schiff, who led the impeachment inquiry.
  • Impeachment cellphone ban gives Senate pages a workout
    President Trump’s impeachment trial may be requiring senators to stay seated hour after agonizing hour, but there’s one group getting lots of exercise: Senate pages. The blue-jacket-clad teens have been running all over the Senate floor, relaying messages between senators and staff, fetching water and even pouring the occasional glass of milk.
  • Hakeem Jeffries responds to protester disrupting Senate impeachment trial
    A protester in the Senate gallery interrupted Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., shortly before the Senate Court of Impeachment’s dinner break at 6:30 p.m., by yelling comments at the senators seated a floor below. The comments were not audible in their in entirety, but the protester could be heard yelling “Jesus Christ” and “Schumer is the devil” before being removed.
  • Trump undercuts military messages on brain injuries
    President Donald Trump’s comment Wednesday that U.S. troops suffering concussion-like symptoms had “not very serious” injuries clashed with a yearslong, hard-fought U.S. military campaign to spread the message that a brain injury is not something to be minimized. Trump was referring to at least 11 cases of troops in Iraq reporting symptoms that officials said may or may not turn out to be so-called traumatic brain injuries, or TBIs.
  • Impeachment an ‘erosion of rule of law,’ claim state attorneys general
    Five state attorneys general addressed the media Wednesday, flanked by Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., and Rep. Lee Zeldin, R-N.Y., to issue a “friend of the Senate brief,” asking the Senate to reject the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. Issued as what appears to be a public relations move, the letter has gained support from attorneys general in 21 states and is meant to resemble an amicus brief. They argue that Trump's impeachment runs counter to that of what the Founding Fathers had intended, accusing Democrats of a factually flawed basis for the president's impeachment.
  • Schiff, Nadler impeachment tension spills out during trial
    The first question at Wednesday’s news conference with House impeachment managers was directed at Rep. Jerrold Nadler, the New York Democrat whose Senate presentation helped prompt a rebuke from Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and a flood of criticism from Republican senators. Nadler appeared to take a half step toward the podium as Rep. Adam B. Schiff cut off the CNN reporter. “I’m going to respond to the questions,” the California Democrat and lead impeachment manager said, then turned to call on another reporter for a question on a different topic. Nadler was silent.
  • Big business, tech, health care lead K Street spending in 2019
    Big business, big tech and medical interests were K Street’s top players last year as those industries spent millions of dollars on federal lobbying in the final months of 2019, while lawmakers and the administration wrapped up spending and trade measures. With the 2020 elections expected to consume lawmakers’ attention this summer and fall, lobbyists say they’re looking at a post-impeachment crunch on major 2020 priorities. Some clients already are gaming out a possible lame-duck session as well as a potentially revamped federal government in 2021.
  • Report: Speed up drug development with artificial intelligence
    More and improved use of artificial intelligence, and an overhaul of medical education to include advances in machine learning, could cut down significantly the time it takes to develop and bring new drugs to market, according to a new joint report by the National Academy of Medicine and the Government Accountability Office. Before that can happen, however, the United States must address legal and policy impediments that inhibit the collection and sharing of high-quality medical data among researchers, the report said.
  • Taylor Swift reaches peak politics with ‘Miss Americana’
    Taylor dropped a teaser Wednesday ahead of her upcoming Netflix documentary “Miss Americana” — and, in typical fashion, the internet needed to calm down. The film, directed by Emmy Award winner Lana Wilson, takes an intimate look at the megastar turned newly minted activist’s career over the last several years: the good, the bad and the political.
  • What to watch during impeachment: Napping senators
    “Spot the snoozing politician” is pretty much an annual tradition at the State of the Union. Now there’s a new chance to play the game. As President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial continues, lawmakers are slouching, yawning and fidgeting — and observers in the gallery are watching for drooping eyelids.
  • Emotional support animals could be banned from planes under DOT rule
    Snakes on a plane? Probably not —at least in the cabin. The U.S. Department of Transportation Wednesday released a proposed rule that would let airlines ban most "emotional support" animals in airplane cabins and board only specially trained service dogs to assist people with disabilities.
  • Schumer says Democrats not looking to make deals over witnesses
    Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer said Wednesday that Democrats aren’t looking to cut deals with Republicans to hear from witnesses in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump.  Asked whether Democrats would be willing to make a deal with Republicans to allow former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter Biden to testify in exchange for witnesses Democrats want like former national security adviser John Bolton, Schumer shot down that notion.
  • Life in the ‘Hakuna Matata’ White House
    There is a lot to learn from covering the White House for four years. For former CQ Roll Call White House correspondent John T. Bennett, that included realizing aides for President Donald Trump were looking into that “Hakuna Matata” thing; whether the president’s accessibility is a double-edged sword; and how to stay sane in a crazy environment. Now as Bennett takes on a new assignment as bureau chief with The Independent of London, he shares some of the biggest lessons he got from life in the Executive Mansion in the latest Political Theater podcast.
  • Managing impeachment: Sensenbrenner’s seen it before
    The opening arguments for President Andrew Johnson’s impeachment trial took 2½ days. Rep. Henry Hyde needed his opening arguments to be shorter in President Bill Clinton’s impeachment trial. Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wisconsin, served as a House manager during the Clinton trial and delivered opening arguments. CQ Roll Call sat with Sensenbrenner to look back on his role in 1999.
  • Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 22
    File updated 10:10 p.m.   Delaware Democrat Chris Coons said House impeachment manager Adam B. Schiff’s closing 30 minutes was “compelling” and that he showed a “mastery” of the material. Coons also said that there were snacks and coffee in the cloakroom. Coons said there has not been much outreach to him from Republicans.
  • Congress saw more bills introduced in 2019 than it has in 40 years, but few passed
    It would stand to reason that representatives and senators, dissuaded by the gridlock in Congress, would hesitate to introduce legislation. After all, only 105 laws were enacted during 2019, a poor showing by historical standards. But that’s not what happened last year. In fact, lawmakers are on a pace to introduce more bills and joint resolutions than they have since the 1970s, when Congresses routinely saw 20,000 or more introduced.
  • Picture Mitch McConnell as a knight riding an elephant
    Maybe you’ve been up late at night watching MSNBC or the NFL Network, and through your bleary eyes have noticed an ad for a chess set featuring Mike Pence as a queen and Nancy Pelosi as a knight riding a donkey. Turns out it’s not some waking nightmare, but instead an ad for the 2020 Battle for the White House Chess Set, an off-kilter idea from the same man who brought the world AmberVision glasses and the PedEgg, which is basically a cheese grater for rough feet.
  • When it comes to Trump’s future, ‘the people’ would rather decide it themselves
    OPINION — Abraham Lincoln closed the Gettysburg Address on a hopeful note, promising a “new birth of freedom” so that “government of the people, by the people and for the people shall not perish from the earth.” Today, as the Democrats push their partisan impeachment forward in the Senate chamber, the sentiments expressed so eloquently by a beleaguered president in the midst of the Civil War are worth remembering. It’s worth remembering that a government of the people must, by definition, be formed by the people.
  • Abortion policy activism heats up for Roe v. Wade anniversary
    Groups pushing for the advancement of abortion rights and those looking to limit the procedure have an ambitious agenda starting this week, foreshadowing a year that could be critical for advocates on both sides of the debate. In two months, the Supreme Court will hear its first major abortion case since 2016, and both sides are revving up for a major presidential election. States are also eyeing a number of new reproductive health bills as their legislatures come back into session.
  • Potential ballot confusion complicates California special election for Katie Hill’s seat
    An unusual message will soon hit mailboxes and social media feeds in former Democratic Rep. Katie Hill’s Southern California district: “For once in your life, vote twice!” The tagline will be featured in mailers and a digital media campaign from Assemblywoman Christy Smith, a Democrat running in the special election to replace Hill in the 25th District. The message underscores concerns that voters may be confused by multiple elections for the same office on the same day, March 3.
  • It’s still difficult to see Trump losing Iowa in November
    ANALYSIS — Iowa gave Barack Obama a resounding 9.5-point victory over John McCain in 2008. Four years later, Obama’s margin shrunk to 5.8 points against Mitt Romney. But in 2016, something odd happened. Donald Trump carried Iowa by 9.4 points — a dramatic change in the state’s recent voting behavior and close to the same winning margin as Obama’s eight years earlier.
  • Capitol Ink | Case Law
    Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call on your iPhone.
  • Senate approves Trump trial rules, lining up a series of late nights
    The Senate voted to approve Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s rules to govern the impeachment trial, which, despite last-minute changes Tuesday, earned no support from Democrats. Senators adopted the updated resolution, 53-47, shortly before 2 a.m. Wednesday morning. The resolution will now give House impeachment managers and Trump’s defense team 24 hours to make their arguments over three days, instead of the two days initially proposed by McConnell.
  • K Street firms post big earnings gains for 2019
    K Street’s top-tier firms posted sizable gains last year, fueled by technology, pharmaceutical and big-business interests concerned with such policy matters as trade, health care, taxation and government spending. And lobbyists say impeachment proceedings and the 2020 campaigns haven’t yet derailed the influence industry’s agenda this year.
  • White House angers GOP senator with executive privilege claim on car tariff report
    The Trump administration is making a sweeping claim of executive privilege on a topic of interest to the Senate this week, and it has nothing to do with the impeachment trial. And the White House is angering at least one Republican senator in the process.
  • View from the gallery: Senators struggle to sit in silence at Trump trial
    Sen. Lindsey Graham looked restless during the first hour of President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, when none of the senators had access to their cellphones and the president’s lawyers and the House managers traded procedural arguments. It was an unusual first day of buttoned-down decorum for the exclusive club of 100 senators-turned-jurors, who were made to stay in their floor seats, not eat, not talk and not tweet during only the third presidential impeachment trial in U.S. history.
  • Congress faces narrow spending increase as VA health care costs balloon
     There is no room for big increases in FY 2021 appropriations bills, even though veterans health care faces much higher costs. CQ Roll Call reporter Jennifer Shutt joins the podcast to explain where the spending bills are going to be squeezed.  

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