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  • Viacom Partners With Tyler Perry for BET Plus Streaming Service June 24, 2019
    Viacom’s BET Networks has teamed with Tyler Perry to create a subscription streaming service that combines the prolific auteur’s library of movies and TV shows with BET’s programming vault. The service dubbed BET Plus will bow in the fall with a handful of original series and productions and a deep library offering that will be […]
    Cynthia Littleton
  • Chinese Drama ‘Better Days,’ Yanked From Berlin Lineup, Has Its China Release Canceled June 24, 2019
    Better days may be a long way off yet for the embattled Chinese drama “Better Days,” which has canceled its mainland China release just three days before the film was to hit theaters. The movie was also pulled at the last minute from the Berlin Film festival lineup in February amid tightening control by China’s […]
    Rebecca Davis
  • China Box Office: ‘Toy Story 4’ Beaten by Old Animated Film ‘Spirited Away’ June 24, 2019
    Disney and Pixar’s “Toy Story 4” has debuted to record-breaking opening weekends all over the world – but not in China, where it was soundly beaten by a nearly 20-year-old Japanese anime classic, Ghibli Studios’ “Spirited Away.” While “Toy Story 4” made film history in territories around the world with the largest-ever three-day opening for […] […]
    Rebecca Davis
  • Keeley Hawes to Star in and Produce Honor-Killing Drama for ITV June 24, 2019
    Keeley Hawes will star as a detective attempting to bring a group of killers to justice in the wake of a so-called honor-killing in “Honour.” The two-part drama is based on the real-life case of Banaz Mahmod, a young Londoner murdered by her own family for falling in love with the wrong man. It is […]
    Stewart Clarke
  • Love Nature Teams with Arte, BBC, Smithsonian on Natural History Series ‘Stormborn’ June 24, 2019
    Love Nature has greenlit “Stormborn,” a wildlife series about animals living in the wildlands of countries on the edge of the North Atlantic. The three-parter will bow on Love Nature’s 4K linear channel and streaming service and then play on Arte in France and Germany, BBC Scotland and Smithsonian Channel. Love Nature is the natural […]
    Stewart Clarke
  • Barcroft Studios Hires John Farrar as Creative Director, Ups Two Execs (EXCLUSIVE) June 24, 2019
    John Farrar, whose credits include “The Imposter,” has joined U.K. producer and digital content specialist Barcroft Studios. The company has also upped two senior staffers, with Alex Morris elevated to chief creative officer and Caspar Norman to chief operating officer. The new recruit joins Barcroft from Nerd TV, the U.K. shingle he co-founded with Jago […] […]
    Stewart Clarke
  • Rihanna Presents Mary J. Blige With BET Lifetime Achievement Award June 24, 2019
    Rihanna took the Microsoft Theater stage on June 23 to present Mary J. Blige with the BET Lifetime Achievement Award. Hailing the legendary singer for her style and sound, Rihanna also made mention of Blige’s history-making two Oscar nominations in the same year, for best actress and original song for “Mudbound.” Accepting the trophy, Blige […]
    Shirley Halperin
  • BET Awards’ Carpet Colored Blue in Honor of Late Nipsey Hussle June 24, 2019
    The 2019 edition of the BET Awards doubled as a celebration of late rapper Nipsey Hussle, who was killed in March outside of his Marathon clothing store in Los Angeles. In honor of the man affectionately known as “Nip,” the carpet was colored blue. “The marathon continues” was a common refrain on the carpet (as […]
    Shirley Halperin
  • BET Awards 2019: The Complete Winners List June 24, 2019
    The 2019 BET Awards kicked off with a performance by Cardi B, who came into the night leading with 7 nominations and, not surprisingly, picked up the award for album of the year for her “Invasion of Privacy.” Other top nominees included Drake with 5, and Beyonce, Travis Scott and J. Cole, each with four. […]
    Shirley Halperin
  • Mubi Streaming Service Launches in Southeast Asia (EXCLUSIVE) June 24, 2019
    Film specialist streaming platform Mubi is to launch in Southeast Asia. The service kicks off with operation in Malaysia, and has plans to quickly launch in another half-dozen territories in the fast-developing region. Mubi will retain its highly curated approach of offering one new film title per day and retaining each for just 30 days. […]
    Patrick Frater

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  • When it comes to Facebook, breaking up is hard to do
    Most of the current lawmakers spending big on Facebook advertisements are Democrats running for president. That’s no surprise, given the effectiveness the social media giant gives them in reaching the slice of the electorate they need to raise money and qualify for primary debates. Still, it’s notable that the one using the platform the most is Sen. Elizabeth Warren, the Massachusetts Democrat who has called for breaking up the tech giant.
  • Trump's 2020 re-election rally signals 2016 strategy may be used again
    Donald Trump repeatedly railed against Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton as a friendly Florida crowd cheered and jeered. Only it wasn’t 2016 — it was just six days ago. The president took a crowd of supporters in Orlando on a journey through time last Tuesday as he formally announced his re-election bid. He dropped his now-familiar attack lines that elicited chants of “Lock her up” for Clinton and boos for Obama.
  • Power of New York, Texas hinges on immigrant count
    Two states that have the most on the line in the Supreme Court case over the citizenship question in the 2020 census are taking drastically different approaches to the decennial count next year. New York and Texas could have the biggest swings in congressional representation after the 2020 census. New York is projected to lose two seats, and Texas could gain as many as three, according to forecasting by the nonpartisan consulting firm Election Data Services. 
  • Congressional compensation: Isn’t there a select committee for that?
    As lawmakers engage in a contentious debate about whether to thaw a decadelong freeze on their pay, there’s a logical place where the underlying issues of member compensation and housing could be addressed — the Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress.  But the panel currently has no plans to take up such matters, its chairman, Rep. Derek Kilmer, and vice chairman, Rep. Tom Graves, told CQ Roll Call. 
  • ‘More practices for this one game than any NFL preseason’: Reps. Gonzalez and Allred on congressional baseball
    Reps. Anthony Gonzalez and Colin Allred both had careers in the NFL before heading to Congress. Now they’re bringing their big-league talent to opposite sides of the congressional baseball diamond. Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call on your iPhone.
  • Road ahead: House and Senate seek to pass dueling border funding bills
    Leaders in the House and Senate want to approve spending at least $4 billion more to address the influx of migrants and their humanitarian needs at the U.S.-Mexico border before the July Fourth recess. Bills in the two chambers differ, however, raising doubts about whether there will be a resolution on President Donald Trump’s desk this month. 
  • Capitol Ink | Hard Lines in the Sand
    Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call on your iPhone.
  • The Facebook coin: What it means for fintech and society
    Welcome to Fintech Beat, the intersection of finance, technology, policy and regulation. Facebook is poised to enter and potentially reshape the cryptocurrency landscape. Host Chris Brummer, fintech regulation expert, and guests mull over what this means for fintech and society. Intro to fintech
  • The financial technology trade wars
       This episode is shipped from Geneva, Switzerland at the World Trade Organization, after host Chris Brummer’s recent trip across the pond. The renowned fintech regulation expert wades into a conversation about where China stands versus the U.S. when it comes to fintech. The answers may surprise you.
  • Exploring the wild, wild west of cryptocurrency exchanges
    This episode of Fintech Beat is devoted to the wild west of cryptocurrency exchanges and assets. These new digital marketplaces are creating a world where traders will be able to exchange cryptographically secured bonds, stocks, currencies, and other kinds of securities. Join host Chris Brummer, a renowned fintech regulation expert on this exploration.  
  • What's in your crypto wallet? And how to keep it safe
    In this episode, host Chris Brummer tackles wallets and how to keep your cryptocurrency safe from cyber thieves. The renowned financial technology regulation expert takes the listener inside a recent conference — Consensus — where industry heavyweights show off the latest offerings.  
  • Trump delays ICE raids hoping for bipartisan plan — but doesn’t say what he’ll support
    President Donald Trump announced Saturday that “at the request of Democrats” a planned roundup of undocumented immigrants will be delayed. In a tweet from Camp David, Trump said he ordered the delay for two weeks “to see if the Democrats and Republicans can get together and work out a solution to the asylum and loophole problems at the southern border.”
  • Working with the enemy? Biden was just doing his job
    OPINION — There’s a name for working with someone you can’t stand. It’s called “legislating.” It used to happen all the time in Washington, and it still does, occasionally. But former Vice President Joe Biden became engulfed by progressive rage this week when he pointed to the late Sens. James Eastland and Herman Talmadge, two avowed segregationists, to describe the civility that Biden said he used to see on Capitol Hill.
  • A conversation with the CFTC regulator — Christopher Giancarlo
    Fintech Beat’s Chris Brummer sits down with Commodity Futures Trading Commission Chairman Christopher Giancarlo — where they talk about financial technology innovation, breaking down barriers and what keeps him up at night.  
  • Financial policy and regulation is changing. We’re going to make sense of it for you.
    In our first episode, we bring you a sneak preview of the Fintech Beat podcast with renowned fintech regulation expert and host, Chris Brummer. We'll bring the listener onto the ground floor of what we plan to bring to market in future episodes.  
  • With Iran reversal, did Trump break pledge to never ‘telegraph’ military ops?
    Iran’s military got a glimpse of how President Donald Trump would attack their country despite his years-old pledge never to “telegraph” U.S. military operations to an enemy. “My administration will not telegraph exact military plans to the enemy,” then-candidate Donald Trump said on Aug. 15, 2016 — less than three months before he was elected president.
  • King of the road trip: Maine senator treks home after canceled flight
    Angus King stayed up way past your bedtime Thursday night. He wasn’t out partying (though he’ll tell you he had a great time) — he was road tripping from D.C. to Maine. The nearly nine-hour trek was a result of storms in Portland and a canceled flight out of Washington. After sitting on the runway at Reagan National Airport for at least an hour waiting for skies to clear, the plane’s captain came over the intercom to give already annoyed passengers even worse news: They’d have to find another way home.
  • Democrats respond with relief to Trump calling off Iran attack
    Democratic response varied Friday to President Donald Trump saying he called off an airstrike against Iran at the last minute, with some renewing their objections to military engagement with Iran without prior congressional approval and others approving of the pull back. Sens. Tom Udall, D-N.M., and Tim Kaine, D-Va., have been leading an effort to attach an amendment to the annual defense policy bill that would require Congress to vote to authorize the use of force before the administration could take military action against Iran.
  • Senators (rich and not-so-rich) fight to keep lawmaker pay freeze
    A bipartisan group of Senators is speaking out against a pay raise for lawmakers. The letter, cosigned by Arizona Democrat Kyrsten Sinema and Republicans Rick Scott of Florida and Mike Braun of Indiana, urges Legislative Branch appropriators to include language in their fiscal 2020 bill to extend the lawmaker pay freeze for another year.
  • Workplace protections for legislative branch employees take effect
    Legislative branch employees can now take advantage of a revised dispute resolution process and consult with a confidential adviser about their rights when they make workplace claims. Those are among the protections in the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 Reform Act. The law also extends workplace protections to unpaid employees, including interns and fellows. Many of the final provisions took effect Wednesday, 180 days after the bill was signed into law in December.
  • The Pentagon has a leadership vacuum at the top as tensions with Iran rise
    The departure of acting Defense Department Secretary Patrick Shanahan raises questions about who is advising President Donald Trump, who pulled back a planned military strike on Iran this week, says CQ defense reporter Andrew Clevenger in this episode of the CQ on Congress podcast. And Chris Lu, who served as Barack Obama's liaison to his Cabinet, says Trump's apparent preference for churn among his agency heads gives him more power to direct policy on his own. Show Notes:
  • Is Tim Kaine a Swiftie? Senator signs musician���s petition to pass Equality Act
    Tim Kaine is the latest politician to hop on board the Taylor train which, I might add, is moving quite swiftly. The Democratic senator joined his colleagues (and presidential candidates) Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker in signing Taylor Swift’s Change.org petition, which urges the U.S. Senate to pass the Equality Act. The bill, passed in the House last month, would bar discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity.
  • Photos of the Week: Biden in DC, Trudeau at the Capitol and victory for the Bad News Babes
    This week, Hope Hicks testified behind closed doors, the Canadian prime minister visited the Capitol Building to collect on his bet with Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Bad News Babes won the annual Congressional Softball Game. All that and more below. Here’s the entire week in photos:
  • Schumer’s mystery tie, Romney’s many houses and Pelosi’s bet with Trudeau: Congressional Hits and Misses
    Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer had reporters decipher his breakfast-themed tie before taking questions at a news briefing. Meanwhile, Sen. Tom Cotton complained about &pizza, Sen. John Thune showed off his absurd pushup skills and Speaker Nancy Pelosi settled a bet with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.  
  • Employers would get subsidies for hiring longtime unemployed workers in draft bill
    A pair of Democratic senators introduced legislation Thursday that would offer subsidies to employers who hire longtime unemployed workers. The draft bill, sponsored by Sen. Chris Van Hollen of Maryland and backed by Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon, aims to assist an estimated 1.3 million people who have been out of work for at least six months. The government would offer one-year subsidies to cover two-thirds of the cost of a new hire’s wages and benefits, although the subsidy could be increased in times of high unemployment.
  • Odd bedfellows share concerns over Pelosi drug plan
    Progressive Democrats are amplifying their criticism of an evolving leadership-driven plan to bring government negotiation to Medicare’s prescription drug benefit, raising issues that echo conservative opposition. The liberal wing says a plan being developed by Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California doesn’t goes far enough in ensuring that the government would be able to negotiate lower prices than the private insurance plans that currently operate Medicare’s prescription drug benefit, Part D.
  • Trump says he aborted strike against Iran because it wouldn’t have been ‘proportionate’
    President Donald Trump on Friday defended his decision to abort strikes on three Iranian targets involved in shooting down a U.S. military drone, saying U.S. forces were “cocked & loaded,” but the expected 150 deaths would not have been a “proportionate” response. The New York Times first reported that Trump ordered strikes on Iranian targets but then canceled the mission with U.S. aircraft en route to take out Iranian missile and radar sites.
  • Meet Beto O’Rourke’s director of women’s messaging
    Anna Pacilio, a native Californian, is starting her second career with a Texas politician. Her latest role? Director of women’s messaging for presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke. Early last year Pacilio walked into Rep. Marc Veasey’s office in D.C. with no connection to the Lone Star State. She researched his district, gave herself a “crash course” in Texas politics, and landed the job of communications director.
  • Live in the ‘here and now,’ even in traffic court, says Rep. Ben Cline
    If you want to get your foot in the door on the Hill, go to your alumni network. That’s one of Ben Cline’s biggest takeaways from his early days as a staffer. Cline, now a congressman himself, started out as a legislative correspondent for Rep. Robert W. Goodlatte. He met the Virginia Republican by volunteering at their mutual alma mater, Bates College.
  • Meet some of the former pros who’ve played in the Congressional Baseball Game
    Reps. Colin Allred and Anthony Gonzalez won’t be the first former professional athletes to compete in the Congressional Baseball Game. Over the decades, Republicans and Democrats have looked to other ex-pros turned congressmen and their athletic talents in hopes of scoring on the diamond. The late Sen. Jim Bunning is the only baseball Hall of Famer to come to Washington. Over a 17-season pitching career from 1955 to 1971, the Kentucky Republican won 224 games and had an earned run average of 3.27. Bunning won election to the House in 1986 and made his Congressional Baseball Game debut the following year. He was part of the winning GOP team at least three times as either pitcher or pitching coach. After two terms in the Senate, Bunning opted against re-election in 2010. He died in 2017 at age 85.
  • For Colin Allred, Major League dreams are close to coming true
    As a kid, Rep. Colin Allred dreamed of playing baseball on a Major League field. The Texas Democrat will get that chance Wednesday night at the Congressional Baseball Game, and he could add significant heft to an already loaded Democratic squad. It hasn’t been a typical path for Allred — college football, the National Football League, law school, a job in the Obama’s administration, and getting elected to Congress to represent the Dallas-area 32nd District.
  • Republicans look to avenge last year’s baseball rout
    Republicans hope that roster additions and A-list advisers can help their team avenge last year’s blowout loss in the Congressional Baseball Game. “Any outcome is going to be better than last year,” says Zack Barth, a staffer for Texas Rep. Roger Williams, who’s been involved with team practices. That’s when Republicans got routed 21-5 behind a complete-game pitching effort from Louisiana Democratic Rep. Cedric L. Richmond. Former New York Rep. Joseph Crowley called it “more of a football game.”
  • Jessica Cisneros wants to put her old boss out of office
    Five years ago, Jessica Cisneros was a 20-year-old intern in Texas Democrat Henry Cuellar’s Washington office. Now, two bachelor’s degrees and a law degree later, she’s running against him in the 2020 Democratic primary for Texas’ 28th District with backing from the group that helped New York’s Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez sweep out longtime Democratic leader Joseph Crowley in a primary last year.
  • From front-runner to also-ran: Looking back on the Dean ‘scream’
    It was the second time Tricia Enright had seen a campaign fly high and crash hard.  Presidential contender and Vermont Gov. Howard Dean had just finished a disappointing third in the 2004 Iowa caucuses when a pep talk urging supporters to keep up the fight ended with an otherworldly yell.
  • Pay debate raging on Capitol Hill ignores lowest-earning staffers
    While Congress tussles over whether a legislative spending bill should allow a salary boost for lawmakers, their staffers agree that the Members’ Representational Allowance — which pays House staff salaries — needs more funding. House Democrats this month pulled the Legislative Branch appropriations bill amid backlash from Republican campaign strategists and members of their own caucus.
  • Trudeau warns about reopening trade talks, but is ‘optimistic’
    After a visit to the White House and Capitol Hill on Thursday, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he is optimistic about the prospects of the United States-Mexico-Canada trade agreement, but added he hoped obstacles in the U.S. don’t lead to reopening negotiations. Trudeau, speaking at a news conference at the Canadian embassy, lauded the “very strong and positive relationship with the United States” that he said came out of USMCA negotiations that were “contentious at times.” 
  • Schumer pushes for vote to make clear Trump needs congressional approval for Iran War
    Returning to Capitol Hill after a meeting at the White House about the shooting down of an American drone, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer increased the pressure for a floor vote to make clear that authorization would be needed for military action against Iran. The New York Democrat highlighted an amendment that has been filed to the fiscal 2020 defense policy bill led by Sens. Tom Udall, D-N.M., and Tim Kaine, D-Va. The Senate is expected to proceed to the Pentagon legislation Monday evening.
  • Hearing on Congressional Research Service zeroes in on diversity issue
    A rare public hearing on Thursday examining the Congressional Research Service revealed concerns about its lack of diversity in its leadership ranks, as members questioned its leader about hiring practices. At Thursday’s House Administration Committee, Rep. Pete Aguilar, D-Calif., asked CRS Director Mary B. Mazanec about the staff closest to her, specifically if any were a person of color, which he defined as “African American, Latino, Asian American, Pacific Islander.” Mazanec said she had “about 12 direct reports,” and only one of them was a person of color.
  • Ghirardelli chocolate and Napa Valley wine: Pelosi pays off Warriors-Raptors bet to Trudeau
    If there wasn’t enough salt in Nancy Pelosi’s wounds after the Toronto Raptors defeated her Golden State Warriors for this year’s NBA championship, she can just steal some from the pistachios she gifted Justin Trudeau. Oh wait, never mind — those are salt-free. The Speaker held up her end of a “friendly” wager with the Canadian prime minister Thursday when she gave him the basket of all baskets, chock-full of some of California’s finest:
  • Bad news Congress, Bad News Babes continue win streak
    For the fourth year in a row, the babes of the press corps defeated Congress at the 11th annual Congressional Women's Softball Game. The charity event raised a record $365,000 to benefit the Young Survival Coalition, an organization that provides aid for young women diagnosed with breast cancer.
  • Roy Moore running again for Senate in Alabama
    Roy Moore, who lost a 2017 special election following allegations of sexual misconduct, announced Thursday that he is once again making a run for the Senate.  Moore joins a number of Republicans already vying for their party’s nomination to take on Alabama Democratic Sen. Doug Jones, who narrowly defeated Moore in 2017.
  • Education Department investigating Duke-UNC event for ‘anti-semitic rhetoric’
    The Department of Education plans to investigate a Middle East studies event hosted by Duke University and the University of North Carolina in which a Palestinian guest performer appeared to lead the attendants in anti-semitic rhetoric. The Duke-UNC consortium on Middle East studies used $5,000 of federal grant money from DOE for the event, the News and Observer in Raleigh reported at the time.
  • White House threatens to veto resolutions blocking Saudi arms sales
    The White House said Thursday it would veto Senate-passed measures to block its proposed arms sales to Saudi Arabia and other Middle East countries. “The transfer of these capabilities and services to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan directly supports the foreign policy and national security objectives of the United States by improving the security of friendly countries that continue to be important forces for political and economic stability in the Middle East,” according to a statement of administration policy memo.
  • These 103 House Democrats have a message for the presidential candidates
    More than 100 House Democrats, including many of the freshmen who won in moderate districts, want to talk to the Democratic presidential candidates.  The New Democrat Coalition, the largest ideological group in the House Democratic caucus, is sending a letter to all the Democratic presidential candidates on Thursday requesting individual meetings with them. 
  • Trump calls Iran move ‘loose and stupid,’ suggests retaliation possible
    Updated 1:11 p.m. | President Donald Trump on Tuesday suggested Iran’s shootdown of an American military drone was just a mistake likely carried out by someone who is both “loose and stupid.” But he also warned Tehran he might retaliate as tensions continue to escalate. Asked if he intends to respond, Trump for the second time within the hour told reporters, “You’ll find out.”
  • Leaders on collision course on member pay raise issue
    Congressional leaders seem to be on a collision course over the issue of raising members’ pay, as the two majority leaders in the House and Senate are heading in opposite directions on the politically fraught issue. House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer told CQ Roll Call Thursday that he expects to bring the Legislative Branch appropriations bill to the floor next week unchanged, meaning without language to block a cost-of-living adjustment to member salaries.
  • Trump energy plan faces legal blitz over weaker emissions standards
    Blue states and green groups are gearing up to sue the Trump administration over its new carbon emissions rule finalized Wednesday, which critics say fails to address climate change and the public health risks associated with pollution from the power sector. The EPA’s Affordable Clean Energy rule rescinds the Obama administration’s ambitious Clean Power Plan and replaces it with less stringent guidelines for states and coal-fired power plants to reduce their emissions.
  • Dems push craft beer tax break renewal, and more in bill headed for markup
    The House Ways and Means Committee announced its long-awaited markup of tax legislation with more than 50 provisions, including expansions of tax credits for lower-income workers and families with children and renewals of expired tax breaks for disparate interests ranging from biodiesel blenders to craft beer producers. Legislation that would beef up the refundable portions of the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit for 2018 and 2019 also includes a repeal of the so-called ″church parking tax,″ that left some nonprofits paying taxes on transportation-related fringe benefits for their employees as part of a change made by the 2017 tax overhaul. Those and other changes in the bill would cost a total of $102.5 billion over a decade, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation, with no offsetting revenue increases or spending cuts.
  • 3 things to watch: Before any Iran conflict, Trump faces war within his own team
    ANALYSIS | Donald Trump is facing one of the biggest tests of his presidency after Iran shot down a U.S. military aircraft, prompting him to declare the islamic republic “made a very big mistake.” His tweet at 10:16 a.m. Thursday broke the nearly 15 hours of essential White House silence on the missile takedown of the RQ-4 Global Hawk drone aircraft. But the U.S. commander in chief did not suggest he is ready to respond — even after a top Iranian official admitted the shootdown was meant as a “clear message” to Washington.
  • Klobuchar, others prod Uber, Lyft on recall safety
    Sen. Amy Klobuchar is prodding the leadership of Uber and Lyft about the safety of their drivers using recalled vehicles. Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat and 2020 White House hopeful, is leading a letter to the ride-sharing companies and is being joined by three senior Democratic members of the Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation.

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