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  • Subway bomber wounds self, three victims in New York December 11, 2017
    NEW YORK (Reuters) - A Bangladeshi man set off a homemade pipe bomb strapped to his body in a crowded New York City commuter hub during the morning rush hour on Monday, officials said, immediately calling it an attempted terrorist attack.
  • Trump wants to send U.S. astronauts back to moon, someday Mars December 11, 2017
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - At a time when China is working on an ambitious lunar program, President Donald Trump vowed on Monday that the United States will remain the leader in space exploration as he began a process to return Americans to the moon.
  • California wildfire rages, threatens communities December 11, 2017
    VENTURA, Calif. (Reuters) - Crews battling a massive wind-driven California wildfire that has torched nearly 1,000 buildings and charred an area larger than New York City on Monday struggled to protect communities menaced by flames along the state's scenic coastline.
  • Women accusing Trump of sexual misconduct seek congressional probe December 11, 2017
    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Three women who have accused U.S. President Donald Trump of sexual misconduct called on Monday for a congressional investigation into his behavior amid a wave of similar accusations against prominent men in Hollywood, the media and politics.
  • Nearly half of Americans still oppose Republican tax bill: Reuters/Ipsos poll December 11, 2017
    WASHINGTON/NEW YORK (Reuters) - As Republicans in the U.S. Congress rush to finish their tax plan, the legislation is not getting more popular with the public, with nearly half of Americans still opposed to it, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Monday.
  • U.S. not granting loan relief to defrauded students: inspector general December 11, 2017
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Education Department under President Donald Trump and Secretary Betsy DeVos has stopped cancelling the student-loan debt of people defrauded by failed for-profit schools and those borrowers face mounting interest and other burdens, its inspector general said on Monday.
  • U.S. judge warns of mistrial in Nevada rancher Bundy's trial December 11, 2017
    LAS VEGAS (Reuters) - A U.S. federal judge in the criminal conspiracy trial of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy and three other men on Monday warned that prosecutors' failure to produce documents that could support defense arguments may lead to a mistrial.
  • Chef Batali exits company, TV show after sex harassment accusations December 11, 2017
    (Reuters) - Celebrity chef Mario Batali said on Monday that he has stepped away from his restaurant company and ABC said it asked him to step aside as co-host of a daytime food and talk show after he was accused of sexual harassment in a report by an online food trade publication.
  • U.S. military must accept transgender recruits by Jan. 1, judge rules December 11, 2017
    (Reuters) - Transgender recruits will be able to join the U.S. military as of Jan. 1 after a federal judge on Monday denied a request by President Donald Trump's administration to enforce his ban on transgender troops while the government appeals an order blocking it.
  • U.S. agency prepares to hand over internet oversight to FTC December 11, 2017
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Federal Communications Commission plans to turn over oversight of internet service providers to another federal agency as it plans to vote on Thursday to revoke the landmark 2015 "net neutrality" rules.

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  • White House Mum on Trump Accusers, But Not on Media
    The president’s top spokeswoman lashed out at the media during a tense briefing Monday. The press corps wanted to know about resurfaced sexual misconduct accusations against the president. Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders wanted to talk about Democrats’ hand in a New York City bombing attack and news media’s loose relationships with facts. President Donald Trump said NASA should hustle-up on getting the country to Mars.
  • Six Things to Watch as Tax Overhaul Endgame Nears
    A number of sticking points emerged last week as Republican lawmakers began jockeying for their favorite parts of the House and Senate tax plans. Top tax writers from each chamber will formally meet Wednesday at 2 p.m. to discuss their differences, but the real negotiations have already begun behind the scenes.
  • Rep. Gwen Moore Asks for Protection for Pages if Roy Moore Is Elected
    Rep. Gwen Moore is asking the Senate sergeant-at-arms and doorkeeper to be proactive in protecting pages if Republican Roy Moore wins Alabama’s special Senate election on Tuesday. In a letter, the Wisconsin Democrat asked what preventive steps are being taken to “safeguard Senate Pages from predatory conduct of U.S. Senators and Senate staff.”
  • Treasury Sees Rosy Revenue Effects of GOP Tax Plans
    The Treasury Department on Monday estimated the Senate Republican tax code overhaul would actually shrink annual deficits over 10 years, a sharp break from congressional revenue estimates showing the GOP tax plans could cost at least $1 trillion over a decade. Treasury’s Office of Tax Policy released a one-page summary of its analysis of the Senate-passed legislation, which predicts the legislation would raise revenue by $300 billion over 10 years compared to current law.
  • Moore Relied Heavily On Fundraising Outside Alabama During Final Campaign Stretch
    The Republican candidate for Alabama’s Senate seat, Roy Moore, raised three times more in big-dollar donations from donors outside his state than from those within Alabama, according to newly released Federal Election Commission data that covers Oct. 1 through Nov. 22 Moore, the former chief judge of the Alabama Supreme Court, raised nearly $680,000 in itemized donations from outside of Alabama during that time, and only $172,000 from donations within the state.
  • Obama Tells Alabama Voters to Reject Roy Moore in Robocall
    Former President Barack Obama threw his weight behind Alabama Senate candidate Doug Jones in a robocall recorded in recent days, CNN reported Monday. Obama recorded his message at the same time President Donald Trump stepped up his campaigning for GOP candidate Roy Moore.
  • Collins Pushed Business Partner’s Brother for Judgeship
    Updated 3:11 p.m.| New York Rep. Chris Collins is pushing for the brother of his business partner to be nominated for the federal bench. Collins invested between $3.5 and $14 million in the business of Nick Sinatra, a developer in Buffalo, the Buffalo News reported. Nick Sinatra’s brother is John Sinatra Jr., who Collins is pushing for a federal judgeship.
  • Brady Aide Pleads Guilty in Payoff Scheme
    A strategist for Rep. Robert A. Brady of Pennsylvania admitted his role in covering up a $90,000 payment to a Democratic primary opponent to drop out of the race.  Donald “D.A.” Jones pleaded guilty to charges of lying to federal agents and agreed to cooperate in the investigation, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported. 
  • The X-Factor in the Alabama Senate Race
    PRATTVILLE, Ala. — For Democrat Doug Jones to win a Senate race in Alabama, he needs some help from voters like 74-year-old Don Jockisch. “I don’t know,” Jockisch, a Republican, said when asked whom he will support in Tuesday’s election, when Jones faces Republican Roy Moore, the former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court.
  • ‘Open Season’ on Immigrants as Discretion Fades
    The recent arrest and detention of an undocumented 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy is the clearest evidence yet that President Donald Trump isn’t focused solely on “bad hombres,” immigrant advocates say. Arrests of undocumented criminals are up under Trump, a testament to his promise to crack down on dangerous immigrants. But arrests of undocumented people without any convictions have also skyrocketed, raising questions about how the administration is using what it says are limited resources to keep the country safe.
  • Trump’s Tweets Again Spark Courtroom Questions on Travel Ban
    President Donald Trump retweeted three anti-Muslim videos last week, just as two appeals courts prepared to hear arguments on challenges to the latest version of his travel ban.  The tweets were bound to come up in court — and they did in a big way Friday, when the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit grilled a Justice Department attorney on whether the tweets taint the restrictions on immigration from eight countries, including six that are majority-Muslim. 
  • Can Presidents Obstruct Justice? Republicans and Democrats Say Yes
    Republican and Democratic lawmakers say an assertion by Donald Trump’s personal lawyer that a sitting president cannot obstruct justice is dubious, warning the White House there is ample precedent to the contrary. The members were reacting to Trump lawyer John Dowd’s legal argument in a recent interview with Axios that “the president cannot obstruct justice because he is the chief law enforcement officer under [Article II of the Constitution] and has every right to express his view of any case.”
  • Moore Absent on the Alabama Senate Campaign Trail
    BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Roy Moore is nowhere to be found. The embattled GOP nominee in the Alabama Senate race has not made a public appearance since Tuesday, though Moore did sit down for an interview on a local Alabama political program. Meanwhile, his opponent, Democrat Doug Jones, has traveled to multiple parts of the state in the weekend leading up to the Dec. 12 special election.
  • Jones Brings in Cavalry to Boost Black Turnout in Alabama Senate Race
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. —  Doug Jones has largely distanced himself from national Democrats in his campaign for Senate in deep-red Alabama. But three days out from Election Day, he’s brought in some national figures to boost turnout from a key voting bloc — African-American voters.  “I’m here to try and help some folk get woke!” New Jersey Democratic Sen. Cory Booker told a crowd of roughly 200 at a rally in Montgomery at Alabama State University.
  • ‘Get Out And Vote For Roy Moore,’ Trump Says
    President Donald Trump on Friday flew 800 miles aboard Air Force One to the doorstep of the hotly contested Alabama Senate race, but addressed it directly for just over three minutes. In a way, however, by using his remarks in Pensacola, Florida, to discuss his agenda and issues that matter to conservative voters just over the border in Alabama, the president sent a message: A vote for GOP candidate Roy Moore is vote for what he calls his “make America great again” agenda.
  • Exclusive: Taxpayers Paid $220K to Settle Case Involving Rep. Alcee Hastings
    The Treasury Department paid $220,000 in a previously undisclosed agreement to settle a lawsuit alleging sexual harassment that involved Florida Democrat Alcee L. Hastings, according to documents obtained by Roll Call. Winsome Packer, a former staff member of a congressional commission that promotes international human rights, said in documents that the congressman touched her, made unwanted sexual advances, and threatened her job. At the time, Hastings was the chairman of the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, where Packer worked.
  • Supreme Court to Hear Maryland Gerrymandering Case
    The Supreme Court late Friday agreed to hear a challenge to the lines of a Maryland congressional district that were drawn by Democrats.   The court has already heard a partisan gerrymandering case from Wisconsin, where Republicans drew the state legislative map. 
  • Arizona Rep. Trent Franks Now Resigning Immediately
    Updated 4:30 p.m. After announcing Thursday that he would resign from Congress as of January 2018, Arizona Rep. Trent Franks announced on Friday he’s resigning immediately, citing a family illness.  “Last night, my wife was admitted to the hospital in Washington, D.C. due to an ongoing ailment. After discussing options with my family, we came to the conclusion that the best thing for our family now would be for me to tender my previous resignation effective today, December 8th, 2017,” Franks said in Friday afternoon statement. 
  • Roy Moore Accuser Says She Added Date and Location to Yearbook Note
    Beverly Young Nelson, one of the women to have levied sexual misconduct allegations against Roy Moore, said she added the date and location below a now-infamous yearbook inscription she has attributed to the Alabama Senate candidate. Nelson and her attorney, Gloria Allred, have offered the yearbook note as proof Moore sought an inappropriate relationship with her when Nelson was 16 and Moore was in his mid-30s.
  • At Odds with NRSC, Montana’s Rosendale Stands by Roy Moore
    Montana State Auditor Matt Rosendale said he supports Alabama GOP Senate nominee Roy Moore "until he’s found guilty of a crime" and praised his public service in a Thursday radio interview.  Rosendale’s comments put him at odds with the National Republican Senatorial Committee, which cut off ties to Moore, and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has called on Moore to step aside. 
  • Trump Signs Bill to Keep Government’s Lights on Through Dec. 22
    President Donald Trump on Friday signed the stopgap spending bill to fund the government through Dec. 22, according to a tweet from White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders.  The House and Senate passed the measure on Thursday, averting a government shutdown, for now.
  • Trump: ‘VOTE ROY MOORE!’
    President Donald Trump on Friday issued an emphatic endorsement of accused child predator Roy Moore, diving back into a special Alabama Senate race just a few days before voters there head to the polls. “VOTE ROY MOORE!” the president tweeted eight hours before a much-anticipated campaign rally in nearby Pensacola, Florida, which bleeds into the southern Alabama television market.
  • NRA, Pro-Gun Lawmaker Exchange Fire Over New Bill
    Kentucky Rep. Thomas Massie butted heads with the National Rifle Association Thursday over a new bill in Congress that addresses deficiencies in the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS), the database of people who are not allowed to buy firearms in America. The NRA, which has given more than $4,500 to Massie’s campaigns, said on its website the congressman was spreading misinformation about the bipartisan bill.
  • LePage Calls ‘Fake News’ on Report Trump Wants Him to Challenge King
    Maine Gov. Paul LePage did not take kindly to a report that President Donald Trump wants him to challenge Maine Sen. Angus King, branding the story as “fake news.” LePage, a businessman-turned-Republican politician, called the report “vile,” according to a tweet by a WCSH-TV reporter. 
  • Arpaio ‘Seriously, Seriously, Seriously’ Considering Run for Flake’s Seat
    Disgraced former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio says he has no interest in running for Rep. Trent Franks’ seat but is considering running for Arizona’s open Senate seat. “I am seriously, seriously, seriously considering running for the U.S. Senate,” he told the Daily Beast. “Not the congressman’s seat.”
  • Arizona State Sen. Kimberly Yee Expresses Interest in Franks’ Seat
    Arizona state Sen. Kimberly Yee expressed interest in replacing Republican Rep. Trent Franks after he announced his resignation on Thursday. Franks, who represents Arizona’s 8th District, announced he would resign after amid a House Ethics Committee Investigation about discussions he had with two female staffers about surrogacy.
  • Senate GOP’s Immigration Bill Without Path to Citizenship Panned
    Senate Democrats and even some Republicans are panning a GOP bill designed to protect undocumented young people and toughen immigration laws because it would not offer the so-called Dreamers a path to citizenship. The bill, introduced this week by Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley and Majority Whip John Cornyn, would offer Dreamers enrolled in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, three years of protected status in return for enhanced border security, a crackdown on “sanctuary” cities and other GOP immigration priorities.
  • Photos of the Week: Three Resignations, a CR Extension and the Holidays Kick Off
    Updated at 10:08 a.m. | The week on the Hill was not short on news. Michigan Rep. John Conyers Jr. resigned amid allegations of sexual misconduct while Minnesota Sen. Al Franken, a fellow Democrat, announced he intended to do the same soon. Late Thursday, Republican Trent Franks from Arizona said he would resign effective Jan. 31 over sexual harassment allegations in his office. At the same time, the funding deadline to keep the government open loomed. But a government shutdown was averted Thursday — at least for another two weeks — when both chambers passed a continuing resolution through Dec. 22. 
  • Ethics Committee Closes Book on Devin Nunes
    The House Ethics Committee on Thursday announced it has closed an investigation into Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, clearing him of claims that he made unauthorized disclosures of classified information. “The committee does not determine whether information is or is not classified ... [so it] sought the analysis of Representative Nunes’s statements by classification experts in the intelligence community,” Ethics Chairwoman Susan W. Brooks and ranking member Ted Deutch said in a statement. “Based solely on the conclusion of these classification experts that the information that Rep. Nunes disclosed was not classified, the committee will take no further action and consider this matter closed.”
  • Ethics Committee Expands Investigation Into Farenthold
    The House Ethics committee announced Thursday it unanimously voted to establish a subcommittee to build on its investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct against Texas Republican Rep. Blake Farenthold. So far, the panel has reviewed more than 200,000 pages and interviewed multiple witnesses, according to a statement released by Ethics Chairwoman Susan W. Brooks of Indiana and ranking member Ted Deutch of Florida. 
  • No Deal For Trump With ‘Chuck and Nancy’ This Time
    “Chuck and Nancy” finally went to the White House on Thursday. But there was no script-flipping deal to be had with President Donald Trump this time. Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., signaled the sides are still too far apart to close a deal, saying at the start of the meeting he was “glad we’re here to resume conversations.”
  • Arizona’s Trent Franks to Resign Jan. 31
    Updated 7:24 pm | Arizona Republican Trent Franks said Thursday he is resigning from Congress effective Jan. 31 amid an Ethics Committee investigation into discussions he had with two female staffers about surrogacy.  In a lengthy statement Thursday evening, Franks said he and his wife struggled with fertility.
  • House Conservatives Mixed Emotions Over White House Confab
    Leaders of the two conservative House caucuses are both hopeful and worried about what’s happening Thursday afternoon at the White House. They hope Speaker Paul D. Ryan is advocating for a Republican-crafted spending strategy during a meeting with President Donald Trump and other congressional leaders. But they worry that negotiations over topline spending numbers could undermine their position.
  • Donald Trump and Nancy Pelosi Agree on These Things
    President Donald Trump nodded as House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi listed issues on which she said the duo agree and she wants to see in a long-term spending measure. That list included the children’s health program, combating the opioid crisis, and veterans funding. She referred to those as “things that have bipartisan support in the Congress.”
  • Want to Know Who Else Has Been Accused of Sexual Harassment in Congress? Good Luck
    The details of sexual harassment complaints against members of Congress and their staffs are secret and cannot be released to lawmakers seeking to determine the extent of the problem on Capitol Hill, a congressional official testified Thursday.  “The law doesn’t allow us to release anything,” said Susan Tsui Grundmann, the executive director of the Office of Compliance, which oversees the response to sexual harassment complaints in Congress. She told a hearing of the House Administrative Committee that if lawmakers want to know more — including the number of complaints filed and the names of the accused — they will have to change the law. 
  • The Strange Day of Senate Farewells
    Thursday became departure day in the Senate, with back-to-back farewell speeches oddly linked due to the recent wave of allegations about sexual harassment. Staffers and visitors, along with members of the media, filled the Senate chamber Thursday morning for Sen. Al Franken’s announcement that he would in fact resign his seat in the aftermath of an ever-increasing number of sexual harassment allegations.
  • House Leaders Show Wide Gap in Year-End Priorities
    The wide gap between Republicans and Democrats on year-end priorities was on full display Thursday as Speaker Paul D. Ryan and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi held their weekly press conferences. Pelosi said Democrats will not support the two-week continuing resolution that the House is voting on Thursday afternoon because it doesn’t address “urgent needs,” while Ryan wouldn’t say explicitly that Republicans have enough votes to pass it on their own.
  • Ryan Still Thinks Moore Should’ve Stepped Down
    Unlike some other Republicans, Speaker Paul D. Ryan is refusing to change his position on Alabama Senate GOP candidate Roy Moore.  “I think he should have dropped out,” Ryan said.
  • Former Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen Running for Senate in Tennessee
    Former Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen is running for the open Senate seat in Tennessee.  “I’m running for the Senate because I have the right kind of experience, and the actual track record that it will take to start working across party lines to fix the mess in Washington,” Bredesen said in announcement video Thursday morning. 
  • Bump Stocks Get First Hearing in Senate, Dealt Another Blow in House
    More than two months after the Las Vegas shooting, the deadliest in U.S. history, the Senate Judiciary committee held a long-awaited hearing addressing the bump stock devices the shooter used to kill more than 50 people and injure hundreds more. “ATF’s authority to regulate firearms is of course limited by the terms of [the 1934 and 1968 firearms laws], and they do not empower ATF to regulate parts or accessories designed to be used with firearms,” Thomas E. Brandon, the acting director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF), told lawmakers.
  • Report: Arpaio Unable to Cite Evidence Against Flake’s Son
    Former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio was unable to cite any evidence while on the witness stand Wednesday in a malicious prosecution suit filed by the son of Sen. Jeff Flake. Last month, Flake’s son Austin filed his suit against Arpaio, saying the sheriff pursued charges against him and his then-wife in 2014 for the deaths of 21 dogs at a kennel his in-laws managed.
  • Franken Makes Democrats Remember ‘Minnesota Massacre’
    Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton will reportedly appoint Lt. Gov. Tina Smith to replace Sen. Al Franken, who is expected to announce his resignation today. Sources told the Minnesota Star-Tribune that Smith is the likely choice to fill Franken’s seat before a special election in 2018.
  • The Unkindest Cut: How to Pay for Tax Overhaul Sweeteners
    As the House and Senate prepare for a conference committee on the Republican tax overhaul, the two chambers face the challenge of reconciling stark differences, and where to find billions of dollars they may need to smooth things over.  Among the most significant discrepancies are the treatments of pass-through businesses, the estate tax and the corporate alternative minimum tax. House Republicans are also considering a provision to further scale back the proposed trimming of the state and local tax deduction.
  • Congress Being Congress: Funding Fight Kicked to Later in December
    Even as President Donald Trump said Wednesday that a government shutdown “could happen,” Congress is on track to pass a two-week continuing resolution to avoid just that. But after that stopgap, there are no guarantees. Republicans are working on a strategy that appears designed to test Democrats’ resolve to pick a fight over their spending priorities.
  • Schumer Told Franken Wednesday Morning That He Needed to Go
    Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer knew it was time for Minnesota Democrat Al Franken to leave the Senate even before the public calls for his resignation Wednesday. The New York Democrat told Franken in a phone call that he needed to resign after Wednesday morning’s publication of further allegations of sexual misconduct by the senator, according to a person familiar with the conversation.
  • Report: Franken to Resign Amid Sexual Misconduct Allegations
    Updated 5:28 p.m. | Minnesota Sen. Al Franken will resign Thursday, a Democratic official told Minnesota Public Radio. The Democratic-Farmer-Labor senator was scheduled to make an announcement Thursday, his office said. He is facing several allegations of sexual misconduct. A sixth accuser alleged Wednesday that Franken had behaved inappropriately toward her.
  • Trump’s Jerusalem Decision Called ‘Provocative,’ Counterproductive
    President Donald Trump says his decision to buck the advice of America’s closest Muslim allies and recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital is part of a broader strategy shift needed to produce a Middle East peace pact. But some lawmakers and experts argue the president has unnecessarily undercut himself. Trump on Wednesday formally announced he will abide by a 1995 U.S. law and move the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem and recognize that city as the country’s official capital. He noted that for the last 22 years, his predecessors have — despite some campaign-trail pledges to the contrary — exercised a waiver in that law to keep the embassy in Tel Aviv.
  • Senate Agrees to Tax Bill Conference With House
    The Senate voted Wednesday to officially begin conference negotiations with House members over a tax code overhaul, as Republicans race to send a finished bill to President Donald Trump’s desk before Christmas. The 51-47 party-line vote was largely a formality. Behind-the-scenes talks have already begun since the Senate passed its version early Saturday morning, following House passage of its own bill before Thanksgiving.
  • Reading Clerk Steals Spotlight in Impeachment Show
    The latest testament to how unusual this year in Congress has been came Wednesday, when the reading clerk of the House of Representatives spelled out the word “bitch” on the chamber floor.  It was just part of the theatrics of the day, as the House voted overwhelmingly to kill articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. 
  • What Happens to Franken’s Seat If He Resigns?
    Minnesota Sen. Al Franken isn’t up for re-election until 2020. But if he announces his resignation Thursday, the North Star State will be holding two Senate elections next fall. Ahead of next November, though, not much would shift in the Senate. If Democratic-Farmer-Labor Gov. Mark Dayton appoints another Democrat immediately, the balance of power in the Senate would remain unchanged.

Axios.Com


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