Friday

Home » Politics

Politics

RSS Google News

RSS Reuters Top News

RSS BBC America

RSS NY Times HomePage

RSS UPI Newstrack

RSS The Hollywood Reporter

  • Streamy Awards 2019: The Complete Winners List December 14, 2019
    The 9th annual Streamy Awards – honoring the best from YouTube and online video – were held Friday night in Beverly Hills. Tana Mongeau was named Creator of the Year by fans while “Good Mythical Morning” won Show of the Year. David Dobrik picked up multiple Streamys, including Best Director and Ensemble Cast (“Vlog Squad”). […]
    Stuart Oldham
  • ‘The Blacklist’ Bosses on Delivering the ‘Really Intense Family Drama That We’ve Been Promising for Seven Years’ December 14, 2019
    SPOILER ALERT: Do not read if you have not yet watched “Katarina Rostova,” the midseason seventh season finale of “The Blacklist.” Since “The Blacklist” began it has been building towards a confrontation between Agent Elizabeth Keen (Megan Boone) and her biological mother, Katarina Rostova (Laila Robbins). That promised confrontation was front-and-center in […]
    Danielle Turchiano
  • Here’s Who’s Raising Money in Hollywood for Pete Buttigieg December 14, 2019
    The Pete Buttigieg campaign released its top bundlers on Friday evening, as it continues to open up its fundraising process to media scrutiny. Buttigieg released the names of 157 members of his “investors circle,” each of whom has raised at least $25,000 for his campaign. Buttigieg is now the most prolific fundraiser in Hollywood, with […]
    gmaddaus
  • Rain Phoenix Joins Pete Yorn for ‘Relator,’ Originally Sung With Scarlett Johansson (Watch) December 14, 2019
    Ten years before “Señorita,” another famous twosome recorded a romantic duet together: Pete Yorn and Scarlett Johansson, who joined forces on “Relator.” It was the first single from an entire album of collaborations, 2009’s “Break Up,” which was inspired by the songs of Serge Gainsbourg and Brigitte Bardot, but fans hardly ever got to hear […] […]
    Shirley Halperin
  • Film Review: ‘Chez Jolie Coiffure’ December 14, 2019
    Shortly before the credits roll on “Chez Jolie Coiffure,” a customer in the eponymous hair salon asks her stylist, Sabine, if she has any plans to go home this year. Out of context, this sounds like the kind of standard, empty small talk one often makes while having one’s hair cut: what good movies you’ve […]
    guylodge
  • ‘Reef Break’ Canceled After One Season at ABC December 14, 2019
    “Reef Break” will not be back for a second season at ABC. The series debuted back in June on the broadcaster and aired 13 episodes, with the finale airing on Sept. 13. It starred Poppy Montgomery as Cat Chambers, Ray Stevenson as Jake Elliot, Desmond Chiam as Wyatt Cole, Melissa Bonne as Ana Dumont and […]
    Joseph Otterson
  • Jeff Shell: Who Is the NBCUniversal Heir Apparent? December 14, 2019
    Analytical, decisive, loyal, fair, empowering. Those are just a few of the choice words industry insiders who have worked with incoming NBCUniversal CEO Jeff Shell — set to succeed current chief exec Steve Burke, as Variety exclusively reported — use to describe the longtime media exec.  On Universal’s North Hollywood lot, many insiders who work […] […]
    elainelow6742
  • Who Votes for the Golden Globes? A Hollywood Foreign Press Association Explainer December 14, 2019
    Each year, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association hands out Golden Globe Awards to the top movies and TV shows of the year. While the Oscars are voted on by thousands of members of the motion picture industry, those who vote on the Golden Globes awards are much less well known. Here’s a FAQ on just […]
    Pat Saperstein
  • How Costumes Convey the Story in ‘The Irishman,’ ‘Dolemite’ and ‘Downton Abbey’ December 14, 2019
    A screenplay’s words are one thing. The director’s visual choices in framing scenes are another. Ruth E. Carter, who won an Oscar earlier this year for her “Black Panther” costume design, “You can’t tell the story in a movie without a costume. A good costume supports the performance and the script. You just go along […]
    jazztangcay
  • The 10 Best Netflix Movies of 2019 December 14, 2019
    This time last year, Netflix estimated that it would release 90 original movies in 2019. At the time, the number seemed outrageous: That’s more than four times the number Warner Bros. made in the same 12-month period — and more than any human would ever care to watch. Guess what: Turns out that 90 was a […]
    Peter Debruge

RSS Accuweather

  • Satellite evades 'day of reckoning' to discover puzzling weather phenomenon on Jupiter December 14, 2019
    At first glance, these newly released images by NASA may look like lava churning in the heart of a volcano, but they reveal otherworldly storm systems whirling in a way that surprised scientists. The swirls in the photos are cyclones around Jupiter's south pole, captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft on Nov. 3, 2019. Juno has...
  • Snowfall causes chaos on highways and byways throughout America December 14, 2019
    Temperatures have fallen, snow has accumulated, ice has stuck and drivers have crashed. As a result, hundreds of drivers from the Northwest to the mid-Atlantic have found themselves, and their vehicles, in places other than their lanes. The wintry weather is a part of a persistent stormy pattern that could bring more trouble in the...
  • The 2019 US tornado season included an 'extraordinary' occurrence December 13, 2019
    A pair of unforgettable tornadoes bookended the 2019 U.S. tornado season, which is effectively over; the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has no reports of tornadoes so far in December. The U.S. tornado season typically runs from March through November or sometimes into early December, although tornadoes can occur at any time.   The yea […]
  • Heavy, gusty storms to rattle Florida, Georgia into Friday night December 13, 2019
    While an outbreak of severe weather is not anticipated, storms capable of producing strong gusts and flash flooding will pester parts of the southeastern United States into Friday night. The thunderstorms are part of a large and strengthening storm that is producing an expanding swath of heavy rain in the eastern third of the nation....
  • Wintry storm to unleash snow, ice and rain as it marches across 2,000-mile stretch of US December 13, 2019
    AccuWeather meteorologists have been monitoring for a parade of storms to sweep across the country throughout the middle of the month, and the next one in line threatens to deliver a dose of wintry weather to more than 100 million Americans over a three- to four-day period. A cross-country storm is set to bring enough...
  • Threat of damaging winds will return to parts of northern Europe this weekend December 13, 2019
    Some of the same European countries battered by strong winds earlier this week will be bracing for more this weekend, while other regions will get their first dose. A storm will sit over Scotland on Saturday and send some pulses of gusty winds from southern Ireland and France to the Baltic States into Monday. “Overall,...
  • Most active early flu season since 2003 already 'wreaking havoc' in US December 13, 2019
    The 2019-2020 flu season follows two straight unusually bad flu seasons. Unfortunately, two key indicators show this year could be more of the same.  First, "This season is off to an early start, earlier than any season this decade," Dr. Bryan Lewis, professor at the University of Virginia, who works in a research partnership with...
  • Ferocious storm toppled a famous shoreline landmark earlier this month December 13, 2019
    Photographers and crowds looking for the perfect shot will have to find a new icon to admire after a storm destroyed this beloved sea stack.
  • Forecasters monitoring potential for major winter storm that could impact Colorado to Maine December 12, 2019
    As the holiday shipping and travel season ramps up, millions of Americans could be dealt an unwanted offering from Old Man Winter. Forecasters say a cross-country storm system could follow multiple paths in the coming days, and depending on which way it unfolds, several major cities could be hit by accumulating and travel-disrupting snow. Typically...
  • Stormy weather to slam Eastern Mediterranean through the weekend December 12, 2019
    Two storms will travel across the eastern Mediterranean Sea, spreading flooding rainfall and snow from Greece and Turkey to Iraq. Wet weather first stretched from southern Greece to Syria on Thursday evening and is expected to spread inland across the Middle East into Friday. Parts of Syria, Iraq and even western Iran will end up...

Amazon Prime Video

Top Political News provided by The Washington Post©

Roll Call©

  • Campus notebook: Which impeachment lawyer makes more?
    Two lawyers with prominent roles in the House impeachment inquiry — Stephen Castor, the Republican general counsel for the Oversight Committee, and Daniel Goldman, a senior advisor for the Intelligence Committee Democrats — testified alongside one another Monday. One difference in the two, besides the parties they represent on their respective panels, is their salaries. According to payroll records from August, Castor makes an annual salary of $165,000—that’s $3,000 more than Goldman makes.
  • Justices decide to wade into separation-of-powers showdown
    The Supreme Court on Friday stepped into the political and legal fight over whether Congress can obtain President Donald Trump’s financial and tax records. The justices agreed to decide two cases in the first separation-of-powers showdown between Congress and Trump to reach the high court. The issue lands there just as the House prepares a floor vote on articles of impeachment.
  • Curbing unexpected medical bills has bipartisan backing in Congress
    Many Americans have been to the hospital in an emergency, or for a procedure, only to get a huge bill after because a doctor treating them doesn’t take their insurance. Republicans and Democrats have reached agreement on legislation to ban so-called surprise billing. CQ Roll Call reporter Mary Ellen McIntire joins the podcast to explain the likely outcome of this bill. Claire McAndrew, Director of Campaigns and Partnerships at FamiliesUSA, which advocates for health care consumers, also joins the show. Show notes: 
  • ‘Yule’ get fewer calories with ‘impeachment lite’ — Congressional Hits and Misses
    Lawmakers got in the yuletide spirit this week while the House Judiciary Committee debated articles of impeachment, which President Donald Trump dubbed “impeachment lite.” “They’re getting ready to vote for their Christmas present,” Rep. Doug Collins said of House Democrats’ impeachment push. All that plus giant imitation sugar packets, cellphone interruptions and December’s obligatory “winter is coming” reference.
  • Analysis: Impeachment’s no ‘game changer’ and other pet peeves
    After weeks of public hearings, I’m ready to take a stand on impeachment. Well, not quite. Actually, there are more than a few pieces of the impeachment coverage, arguments, and narrative that are driving me crazy. And writing a few hundred words seems like a semi-healthy way to attempt to set the record straight. Impeachment is not a game-changer until proven otherwise. I’m skeptical that impeachment will fundamentally alter the electoral landscape, in part, because it has not dramatically swayed voters’ opinions of the president so far. According to Friday’s RealClearPolitics average, President Donald Trump’s job approval rating was 44 percent compared to 54 percent disapprove. On Sept. 24, when Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the formal impeachment inquiry, it was 45 percent approve and 52 percent disapprove. Maybe something can be historic and politically insignificant at the same time.
  • Trump appears to back short Senate impeachment trial
    On the day the House Judiciary Committee approved impeachment articles against him, President Donald Trump claimed it is strengthening him politically. And with those articles headed to the House floor next week he appears warming to a quick election-year Senate trial. In brief but animated remarks, the president defiantly declared of the shape and length of an expected Senate trial: “I’ll do whatever I want.”
  • War on Christmas (decorations) comes to Capitol Hill
    Rep. Val Demings was overheard this week telling a reporter she felt “pressure” to step up her office’s holiday decorations after fellow Florida Rep.  Charlie Crist displayed a quintessential light-up palm tree and flamingo outside his. The 7.5-foot inflatable holiday Mickey Mouse (she represents the Orlando area, home to Disney World) that guards her door declined to comment on the matter — perhaps because he heard about the unfortunate fate of a nearby air-filled brethren.
  • Photos of the Week
    During what was scheduled to be the final week of Congress before the Christmas recess, a deal on funding the government, an agreement on the trade agreement that would replace NAFTA, and advancement of the articles of impeachment set up an extra week of work on Capitol Hill. Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call on your iPhone.
  • Try again: Lofgren rejects House Clerk’s eyebrow-raising choice
    Rep. Sean Duffy left Congress months ago, but his office remains without a chief after a key lawmaker rejected an attempt to install a recent college graduate with no legislative experience and who is the daughter of a House official. Duffy’s last chief of staff, Pete Meachum, departed the post on Dec. 6.
  • Judiciary Committee sends Trump impeachment articles to the House floor
    The House came one step closer to impeaching President Donald Trump after the Judiciary Committee on Friday morning approved charges that Trump obstructed Congress and abused his power. Next week, for the first time in more than two decades, and only the third time in U.S. history, the full House will consider articles of impeachment against a sitting president.
  • Impeachment news roundup: Dec. 13
    After a 14-hour marathon on Thursday, the House Judiciary Committee took less than 10 minutes to approve the two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Friday. Both articles were approved on 23-17 party-line votes.
  • Tax code typo is harming America’s restaurants
    OPINION — Washington, D.C., is my adopted home, and it is where my restaurants have been embraced, including Succotash in our Penn Quarter and National Harbor locations and MiVida in District Wharf. And we have plans to open several new locations including The Grill in District Wharf, and Gatsby and Mah-Ze-Dahr at Capitol Riverfront, the home of our World Series champions.
  • The real war on Christmas: Who unplugged Perlmutter’s snowman?
    It was just a friendly Christmas decorating competition in the Longworth House Office Building halls. But then, an innocent snowman was slain. Kathryn Lyons investigates. Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call on your iPhone.
  • Thornberry calls for US action to deter Iran aggression
    Iran is likely to attack more Western targets in the Middle East soon, and the United States will need to respond, Mac Thornberry of Texas, the top Republican on the House Armed Services Committee, said in an interview Thursday. “I expect Iran will take further provocative actions in the coming weeks,” Thornberry said on a C-SPAN “Newsmakers” program set to air Friday night.
  • Gaetz's 2008 DUI resurfaces during impeachment debate
    Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., cited a New Yorker profile of Hunter Biden during amendment debate Thursday during the House Judiciary Committee’s markup on articles of impeachment. The profile alleged crack cocaine use by Hunter Biden, which Gaetz read out loud to the panel. Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Ga., was quick to respond, saying, “The pot calling the kettle black is not something we should do.” The idiom was a nod to Gaetz’s 2008 arrest for driving under the influence.
  • Ivanka gets President Trump to make the pitch for paid leave
    “I had a very busy time and a very busy day, and my daughter said, ‘You will be here,’ so that was the end of that busy day,” President Donald Trump told a White House audience Thursday morning during a discussion on paid parental time off. Ivanka Trump, first daughter and presidential adviser, gathered Capitol Hill lawmakers, governors, a cabinet secretary — and, yes, the president — at the White House in an attempt to generate momentum for paid family leave.
  • Appropriators reach spending agreement, fend off possibility of government shutdown
    Republicans and Democrats reached agreement “in principle” Thursday on $1.37 trillion in government funding, staving off the possibility of another shutdown just a week before spending is set to run out, according to Appropriations Committee leaders. The deal — reached just hours after a meeting between Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, House Appropriations Chairwoman Nita M. Lowey and Senate Appropriations Chairman Richard C. Shelby— ends months of tense negotiations that revolved around border wall funding.
  • At the Races: Walking and chewing
    By Bridget Bowman, Simone Pathé and Stephanie Akin Michigan Democratic Rep. Haley Stevens reminded a group of reporters yesterday, “It’s sort of the metaphor of walking and chewing gum at the same time that everybody likes to use around here.”
  • Official: White House not worried Senate’s lack of input might sink USMCA
    The White House has no concerns that Republican senators might jump ship on President Donald Trump’s sweeping USMCA trade pact after they were told Thursday a deal with House Democrats will leave them unable to press for further changes. “We haven’t heard any Senate Republicans come out and say they’re opposing the deal on substance,” a White House official said Thursday, granted anonymity to be candid. “I have no concerns.”
  • J. Brett Blanton on track to become next architect of the Capitol
    Most of J. Brett Blanton’s nomination hearing before the Senate Rules Committee to be the next architect of the Capitol on Thursday was essentially a one-on-one public interview between him and Chairman Roy Blunt, as the remaining 18 members of the committee were absent for the majority of the hearing. No opposition to Blanton, a Virginia resident, is evident, making him likely to be confirmed as the 12th architect of the Capitol. If confirmed, Blanton said he expects to start leading the agency by mid-January.
  • Democratic Tri-Caucus to track diversity of witnesses in House hearings
    The chairs of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, Congressional Black Caucus and Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus announced Thursday that starting in January 2020 they will track the diversity of witnesses testifying in House committee hearings.  Collectively known as the Tri-Caucus, the groups want to ensure diversity of witnesses that help inform policies and legislation to ensure the laws Congress passes are “inclusive and work for Americans of all backgrounds.”
  • After months of delay, DeVos touts limited student loan forgiveness plan
    Education Secretary Betsy DeVos sought to defend her department’s 18-month delay in processing rising numbers of student loan forgiveness claims, saying at a Thursday hearing that officials lacked a proper process to review them. Roughly 240,000 claims remain outstanding as DeVos has sought to change the department’s process to allow students who have been defrauded by colleges to have their federal student loans canceled.
  • Nadler pushes votes on impeachment articles to Friday morning
    The House will come one step closer to impeaching President Donald Trump Friday when the Judiciary Committee is expected to approve charges of obstruction of Congress and abuse of power. The panel abruptly recessed after 11 p.m. Thursday night after more than 14 hours of debate just before they were expected to take final votes on the articles, extending the impeachment markup into a third day.
  • James Lankford to chair Senate Ethics Committee
    Sen. James Lankford will take over as chairman of the Ethics Committee, succeeding Georgia Republican Johnny Isakson, who will retire at the end of the year, according to a senior Republican aide. The Oklahoma Republican will lead a six-member, bipartisan committee charged with investigating violations of Senate rules. The committee’s most recent actions were in April 2018, when it published a public letter of admonition to Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J.
  • Livestream: Articles of impeachment markup
    The House Judiciary Committee meets to debate the language in articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. Opening statements of the markup began Wednesday night. Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call on your iPhone.
  • Impeachment news roundup: Dec. 12
    As the House Judiciary Committee debated the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday again declined to explain to reporters why certain charges were left out of the articles. On Tuesday she was dismissive when asked why Democrats did not include obstruction of justice as outlined in the special counsel report on its investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 election and Trump’s campaign. During her weekly news conference on Thursday, it was the exclusion of bribery she didn’t want to explain.
  • Ways and Means offers its own plan on surprise medical bills
    The House Ways and Means Committee released its own proposal Wednesday for ending surprise medical bills, potentially complicating an effort by some lawmakers to include a rival proposal in a year-end spending bill. Surprise out-of-network medical bills are unpopular among the public, both parties and President Donald Trump. But lawmakers disagree about the details of how to pay doctors and other medical providers when a patient unexpectedly gets out-of-network care at an inpatient hospital or in other unanticipated scenarios.
  • Where the real battle for votes lies
    Call it President Donald Trump’s Guadalcanal: Like the tiny island U.S. Marines invaded in World War II to break Japan’s Asia-Pacific chokehold, little Juneau County, Wisconsin, is where Trump needs to halt the Democrats’ advance.  The struggle for 2020 hearts and minds is more than a referendum on the tweeter-in-chief’s behavior — it’s about the “future of work.” For counties like Juneau and others in battleground states, a thriving middle class means a restored American manufacturing base.
  • Voting rights, a partisan issue? Yes, Republicans have fallen that far
    OPINION — Stacey Abrams has it right, for right now. She lost her 2018 race to be the governor of Georgia to Republican Brian Kemp, who as secretary of state was in charge of the election, a situation that would not pass the sniff test in North Korea. OK, that comparison is a little far-fetched, but only a little.
  • These Democrats helped launch the impeachment inquiry. What’s their next move?
    Two months ago, seven freshman Democrats in the House published an op-ed column in The Washington Post that helped launch the impeachment inquiry. Now that the inquiry’s over, the freshmen are not saying what they will do next. The op-ed made clear the writers, who all have national security backgrounds, thought it would be “an impeachable offense” if reports were true that President Donald Trump pressured the Ukrainian president to investigate a political rival while withholding aid to the country.
  • Capitol Ink | Woke
    Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call on your iPhone.
  • Amid impeachment saga, a kitchen sink of legislative dealing
    The holiday rush on Capitol Hill is in full swing, and the bipartisan legislative lethargy is showing signs of easing even as the House debates articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. Senate and House negotiators are still trying to reach an agreement on a bundle of spending bills, but there has been a relative abundance of other bipartisan deal-making and even actual legislation passing in the Senate.
  • OMB: Ukraine aid delay was consistent with law, past practice
    The White House budget office on Wednesday defended its temporary withholding of almost $400 million in Ukraine security-related funds earlier this year, saying the episode was in keeping with longstanding authorities that allow the executive branch to control the flow of appropriated funds. “It was OMB’s understanding that a brief period was needed, prior to the funds expiring, to engage in a policy process regarding those funds,” says the nine-page Office of Management and Budget letter to the Government Accountability Office, which had inquired about the legality of the move. “OMB took appropriate action, in light of a pending policy process, to ensure that funds were not obligated prematurely in a manner that could conflict with the President’s foreign policy.”
  • Judiciary kicks off impeachment articles markup with expected polarization
    The House Judiciary Committee’s markup of two articles of impeachment charging President Donald Trump with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress kicked off Wednesday with Chairman Jerrold Nadler trying to set a “solemn” tone and ranking member Doug Collins accusing that of being a ruse.  Nadler opened the markup with a note about why he was breaking the custom of having only the chairman and the ranking member deliver opening statements to provide each panel member the opportunity to give five minutes of opening remarks.
  • As Super Bowl LIV draws near, Congress still tackling one of the event’s biggest problems
    The question of whether the Super Bowl attracts higher volumes of human trafficking in its host city has long been debated. At the least, it provides a megaplatform, and opportunity, for awareness. “We do have a comprehensive approach for Miami-Dade, and that’s been put together over the years, but the advantage of the Super Bowl for us is to educate the entire community,” Rep. Donna E. Shalala told HOH.
  • Study shows growing ocean damage as protection bills languish
    As lawmakers push legislation to protect the nation’s coastal waters, scientists are placing much of the blame for degrading ocean conditions on emissions from large energy companies including Exxon Mobil Corp., which was cleared Tuesday in a long-running climate court case. A study published Wednesday in the scientific journal Environmental Research Letters found that carbon emissions from the largest energy and cement companies are responsible for more than half of a damaging side effect: increasing acidity in the planet’s oceans, which harms marine life and coastal economies.
  • In scrutinizing IG report on FBI, senators differ on what’s important
    Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz told a Senate Committee on Wednesday that although the FBI’s counterintelligence probe of Donald Trump’s campaign was not motivated by political bias, the agency misled a surveillance court in seeking to obtain warrants for tracking a campaign surrogate. Lawmakers on the Senate Judiciary Committee, however, remained divided along party lines in what they chose to focus on during Horowitz’s testimony, which came a day after his office released the 434-page report of its investigation.
  • Lowey: Spending deal looking more likely this week
    Congress and the Trump administration could reach agreement on full-year spending bills as soon as Thursday, according to House Appropriations Chairwoman Nita M. Lowey. “If all goes well, we could have a deal by the end of the day tomorrow,” Lowey said Wednesday evening after reviewing an offer Republicans sent over midday. “I think their offer was real and we’re discussing it and we can find some agreement.”
  • Passion play: Trump drags FBI ‘lovers’ Strzok and Page into 2020 race
    This time, Donald Trump was less animated while dramatizing the pillow talk. But the president still went there Tuesday night, eager to turn two former FBI employees into characters in the 2020 campaign narrative he’s building. And some of his congressional GOP allies are happy to help. “I love you so much, Lisa. Please, Lisa! Lisa, I’ve never loved anyone like you. We won’t allow this to happen to our Lisa,” Trump told an arena full of supporters in Hershey, Pennsylvania. “Please tell me you love me, Lisa! I love you, Peter. I love you! I love you like I’ve never loved anyone!”
  • Congress poised to pass paid parental leave for federal workers
    About 2 million federal employees are about to be guaranteed 12 weeks of paid parental leave under a bill soon to be signed into law by President Donald Trump, but several experts say the cost of such a benefit may discourage Democrats’ hopes of it spurring broader adoption in private industry. The provision, folded into a defense bill months in the working, would give all federal civilian employees three months of paid leave for the birth, adoption or fostering of a child. Democrats originally pushed for a broader set of benefits to cover family relations and illnesses but praised the measure’s inclusion. Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney, who chairs the Oversight and Reform Committee, touted the provision as “long overdue.”  
  • Latest additions to National Film Registry a political smorgasbord
    The 2019 additions to the National Film Registry, unveiled Wednesday by the Library of Congress, provide film buffs with a wide array of works with contemporary political relevance — spanning from 1903’s “Emigrants Landing at Ellis Island” to 2003’s “The Fog of War.” “The National Film Registry has become an important record of American history, culture and creativity,” Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden said in a statement announcing the list. Not everything is political, of course, and some of the movies are there simply because they found a way into the public’s imagination, like Kevin Smith’s 1994 slacker day-in-the-life comedy “Clerks,” or recorded a singular moment, like Martin Scorsese’s 1978 concert film “The Last Waltz,” which chronicled The Band’s final performance in San Francisco.  
  • Powerful patrons duel over California projects in final spending package
    The top Democratic and Republican leaders in the House are pushing for their own home-state projects in this year’s final spending bills — a spectacular park overlooking San Francisco Bay and a dam across the largest reservoir in California — but without agreement from each other in the negotiations’ final days. The two items in dispute — the Presidio park project championed by Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Shasta Dam expansion sought by House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy — are among some 200 disagreements that need to be resolved by leadership to finish up the appropriations legislation.
  • FAA review predicted fatalities after first Boeing 737 Max crash
      About a month after a Boeing 737 Max plunged into the Java Sea, killing 189 people in October 2018, the FAA privately conducted a grim analysis that predicted more fatal crashes for the aircraft, according to a report released at a House hearing Wednesday.
  • House urges Supreme Court to enforce subpoenas for Trump’s financial records
    The House cited 2020 election security concerns Wednesday when it urged the Supreme Court not to delay the enforcement of congressional subpoenas for financial records of President Donald Trump and his business from Deutsche Bank and Capital One Financial Corporation. Any harm to Trump for allowing the enforcement of the House Financial Services and Intelligence committees would be less severe than Congress not getting information it needs to protect the elections from foreign influence, House attorneys argued in a Supreme Court filing.
  • Impeachment news roundup: Dec. 11
    The House Judiciary Committee began marking up articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Wednesday evening and is expected to vote on them Thursday. In his opening statement, Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler addressed why impeaching Trump was warranted when a presidential election is less than a year away. 
  • With scores to settle, Trump slams ‘crooked bastard’ Schiff over impeachment
    ANALYSIS — President Donald Trump went to Hershey, Pennsylvania, with a few scores to settle hours after House Democrats unveiled two articles of impeachment they appear poised to pass next week. For more than an hour, Trump railed against House Intelligence Chairman Adam B. Schiff and Speaker Nancy Pelosi as a throng of supporters inside the Giant Center booed, cheered and laughed — depending on the insult of the moment. He dubbed Schiff a “dishonest guy” and a “crooked bastard” and claimed the speaker has “absolutely no control” over a caucus that has lurched dramatically to the left.
  • Ivanka Trump’s paid leave summit marks turning point in long battle to get Republican buy-in
    Ivanka Trump’s White House summit on paid family leave marks a significant turning point in her quest to get Republicans on board her pet issue.  Soon after Donald Trump arrived at the White House in 2017, some skeptics comforted themselves knowing that the first daughter and adviser to the president would be there to sand down some of her father’s rougher edges. But so far, Ivanka has been one of the quieter voices in an administration driven by hard-liners such as immigration specialist Stephen Miller.
  • Elizabeth Warren’s big bad idea: Taxing our way to prosperity
    OPINION — Last week, a New York Times headline caught my eye. “Could tax increases speed up the economy? Democrats say yes.” The story, written by Jim Tankersley, explained that Elizabeth Warren is “leading a liberal rebellion” against the “long-held economic view that large tax increases slow economic growth.” Given the miserable track record of redistribution politics as economic theory and the strength of today’s free-market economy, I had to read on. Was this a case of economic illiteracy on the part of Warren and her fellow quasi-socialists who seem to be driving the Democratic debate? Or was this latest fascination with redistribution of wealth a focus group-tested battle cry for the base? Or maybe this was just the latest iteration of Democrats’ failed economic theories last seen in 2010 when Joe Biden promised a recession-weary America a “summer of recovery” that didn’t happen.
  • House Democrats abandon crimes in Trump impeachment articles
    House Democrats spoke for months about how investigations had established crimes that President Donald Trump committed, but on Tuesday they did not specifically include those allegations in articles of impeachment under the constitutional standard of “high crimes and misdemeanors.” The two articles of impeachment Democrats filed — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — stayed away from detailing where Trump might have broken the law with his dealings with Ukraine or interactions with the special counsel probe into Russian interference with the 2016 election.
  • National Democratic groups litigate 2020 in the courts
    More than in previous election cycles, national Democratic groups are making litigation over election and voting laws a key part of their 2020 strategy.  A handful of Democratic groups are currently litigating about a dozen cases over what they see as unfair election laws and maps across the country. 

McClatchy©


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: